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Relaxation

Ng Tung Chai: take refreshing waterfall hike among the foothills of Hong Kong's highest peak

  • About 7 km

  • About 3–4 hours

  • Difficult

Written by South China Morning Post

The spectacular waterfalls comprising Ng Tung Chai Waterfalls — Bottom, Middle, Main and Scatter — lie in the foothills of the 957-metre-high Tai Mo Shan, Hong Kong’s tallest peak. The soothing sight and sound of the relentless, ever-rushing waterfalls will have a calming effect on even the most restless of minds. Standing beneath these craggy, lush-forest-shrouded waterfalls — offering a stunning backdrop to photographs and videos — serves as exhilarating, sometimes hard-earned rewards after escaping the frantic-paced city for a few hours, and winding your way along the sometimes steep and challenging trail to reach them.

Refuel

There are no official places to refill water bottles or buy snacks along the route once you leave Tai Po. So bring enough supplies for a challenging uphill hike, or collect provisions at a convenience store near the MTR station before you board the bus.

  • Bottom Fall

    Bottom Fall is arguably the most mystical of the four waterfalls along this epic trail. Arriving there feels as if you’ve stepped into the heavily forested world of Pandora from the science fiction film, Avatar. Hanging branches reach down towards large boulders that give way to an inviting natural pool at the base of Bottom Fall. If you stand in the right spot, to the left of this natural grove and look up, you’ll be able to photograph three different waterfalls in one spectacular shot.

    Get me there
  • Middle Fall

    The soothing whoosh made by Middle Fall, situated in a wide, pleasingly open environment, makes an instant impression on visitors as they pause amid the rocks while looking up at the tumbling water. Its constant, reassuring rhythm, like soft rainfall hitting rocks, is amplified because of the setting and height of the waterfall. You should take a moment to sit and relax beside the small pool before you start the most challenging climb of the hike — for feet and hands.

    The hiking trail to Ng Tung Chai Waterfalls is difficult, so make sure you equip yourself with suitable hiking gear and take adequate safety precautions. Pack a fully charged mobile phone — and more than 1 litre of water per person, especially on hot days, as there are no refill stops along the route; it's not recommended you drink the river water. The hardest section of the trail, between Middle and Main falls, has been supplemented with border steps and railings but you are reminded to remain cautious while hiking.

    Get me there
  • Main Fall

    With a drop of 35 metres, the Main Fall is the city’s highest waterfall. Whether it’s the truly epic nature of the beautiful setting before you, or the joy you feel at having reached this goal after completing the arduous uphill climb, Main Fall will take your breath away. The air is noticeably cooler in the shadow of this rocky colossus, too, so it’s no surprise to see different butterflies thriving in this heart-stirring natural haven.

    Get me there
  • Scatter Fall

    Take a deep breath when you arrive at the last waterfall — and not only because of the feeling of accomplishment, but because the air seems to smell sweeter. It might have something to do with the many flowers dotted amid the rocks beside the dancing sprays of water. As its name implies, the water at Scatter Fall looks like long, flowing locks of hair scattering down the side of the hill. In the shade at the top of the fall you may spot a single stunning red flower. There is also a cave to the right of the pool.

    Be aware of changing weather conditions when you visit the waterfalls. Extreme weather, such as thunderstorms, typhoons and heavy rains, may trigger flooding, flash floods or even a landslide. Don’t walk, swim or play in the streams, waterfalls or ponds; and pay close attention to warning signs along the route. Visit the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department’s website for more safety tips.

    Get me there
  • Dining Option
    Tai Po Market

    If you take bus 64K back to Tai Po from Ng Tung Chai, why not combine your hiking trip with a visit to Tai Po Market (also known as Tai Po Hui)? You can get off at the Kwong Fuk Road stop and follow Wan Tau Street to visit the local shops and markets around the Tai Ming Lane Square. For a quick meal, head to the cooked food centre at the Tai Po Complex, where a selection of vendors serve local delights such as fish ball noodles, pork chop noodles, beef brisket noodles and Chinese dim sum. The neighbourhood is also home to many other dining options, from an English pub to a Chinese barbecue restaurant known for its roast goose.

    Get me there

Transport

Getting to Bottom Fall

From MTR Tai Po Market Station, you can walk to the adjacent bus terminus to take bus 64K to Yuen Long. Alight at the Ng Tung Chai stop and follow the signs to the falls, and past the monastery to a crossroads. Stay left and you’ll soon reach Bottom Fall.

Leaving from Scatter Fall

From Scatter Fall, take the path until you reach a small ridge. Stay right on a path that hugs the side of the hill until you reach a fork leading off to Tai Mo Shan on your left. Take the steps down to the right instead, and you’ll come to a familiar junction. Turn left and head past the monastery again to Ng Tung Chai Road and the bus stop beyond where you can take bus 64K back to MTR Tai Po Market Station.

More Routes

Relaxation

Ng Tung Chai: take refreshing waterfall hike among the foothills of Hong Kong's highest peak

  • About 7 km

  • About 3–4 hours

  • Difficult

Written by South China Morning Post

The spectacular waterfalls comprising Ng Tung Chai Waterfalls — Bottom, Middle, Main and Scatter — lie in the foothills of the 957-metre-high Tai Mo Shan, Hong Kong’s tallest peak. The soothing sight and sound of the relentless, ever-rushing waterfalls will have a calming effect on even the most restless of minds. Standing beneath these craggy, lush-forest-shrouded waterfalls — offering a stunning backdrop to photographs and videos — serves as exhilarating, sometimes hard-earned rewards after escaping the frantic-paced city for a few hours, and winding your way along the sometimes steep and challenging trail to reach them.

Refuel

There are no official places to refill water bottles or buy snacks along the route once you leave Tai Po. So bring enough supplies for a challenging uphill hike, or collect provisions at a convenience store near the MTR station before you board the bus.

Bottom Fall

Bottom Fall is arguably the most mystical of the four waterfalls along this epic trail. Arriving there feels as if you’ve stepped into the heavily forested world of Pandora from the science fiction film, Avatar. Hanging branches reach down towards large boulders that give way to an inviting natural pool at the base of Bottom Fall. If you stand in the right spot, to the left of this natural grove and look up, you’ll be able to photograph three different waterfalls in one spectacular shot.

See more...
Get me there
Middle Fall

The soothing whoosh made by Middle Fall, situated in a wide, pleasingly open environment, makes an instant impression on visitors as they pause amid the rocks while looking up at the tumbling water. Its constant, reassuring rhythm, like soft rainfall hitting rocks, is amplified because of the setting and height of the waterfall. You should take a moment to sit and relax beside the small pool before you start the most challenging climb of the hike — for feet and hands.

See more...

The hiking trail to Ng Tung Chai Waterfalls is difficult, so make sure you equip yourself with suitable hiking gear and take adequate safety precautions. Pack a fully charged mobile phone — and more than 1 litre of water per person, especially on hot days, as there are no refill stops along the route; it's not recommended you drink the river water. The hardest section of the trail, between Middle and Main falls, has been supplemented with border steps and railings but you are reminded to remain cautious while hiking.

Get me there
Main Fall

With a drop of 35 metres, the Main Fall is the city’s highest waterfall. Whether it’s the truly epic nature of the beautiful setting before you, or the joy you feel at having reached this goal after completing the arduous uphill climb, Main Fall will take your breath away. The air is noticeably cooler in the shadow of this rocky colossus, too, so it’s no surprise to see different butterflies thriving in this heart-stirring natural haven.

See more...
Get me there
Scatter Fall

Take a deep breath when you arrive at the last waterfall — and not only because of the feeling of accomplishment, but because the air seems to smell sweeter. It might have something to do with the many flowers dotted amid the rocks beside the dancing sprays of water. As its name implies, the water at Scatter Fall looks like long, flowing locks of hair scattering down the side of the hill. In the shade at the top of the fall you may spot a single stunning red flower. There is also a cave to the right of the pool.

See more...

Be aware of changing weather conditions when you visit the waterfalls. Extreme weather, such as thunderstorms, typhoons and heavy rains, may trigger flooding, flash floods or even a landslide. Don’t walk, swim or play in the streams, waterfalls or ponds; and pay close attention to warning signs along the route. Visit the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department’s website for more safety tips.

Get me there
Dining Option
Tai Po Market

If you take bus 64K back to Tai Po from Ng Tung Chai, why not combine your hiking trip with a visit to Tai Po Market (also known as Tai Po Hui)? You can get off at the Kwong Fuk Road stop and follow Wan Tau Street to visit the local shops and markets around the Tai Ming Lane Square. For a quick meal, head to the cooked food centre at the Tai Po Complex, where a selection of vendors serve local delights such as fish ball noodles, pork chop noodles, beef brisket noodles and Chinese dim sum. The neighbourhood is also home to many other dining options, from an English pub to a Chinese barbecue restaurant known for its roast goose.

See more...
Get me there

Transport

Getting to Bottom Fall

From MTR Tai Po Market Station, you can walk to the adjacent bus terminus to take bus 64K to Yuen Long. Alight at the Ng Tung Chai stop and follow the signs to the falls, and past the monastery to a crossroads. Stay left and you’ll soon reach Bottom Fall.

Leaving from Scatter Fall

From Scatter Fall, take the path until you reach a small ridge. Stay right on a path that hugs the side of the hill until you reach a fork leading off to Tai Mo Shan on your left. Take the steps down to the right instead, and you’ll come to a familiar junction. Turn left and head past the monastery again to Ng Tung Chai Road and the bus stop beyond where you can take bus 64K back to MTR Tai Po Market Station.

More Routes

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