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Relaxation

Lamma Island: savour laid-back vibe of historic fishing villages now home to multicultural community

Written by South China Morning Post ( Morning Studio )

Lamma Island's laid-back charms — just a short ferry ride from Hong Kong Island — will help you escape the city's hectic lifestyle. Long associated with the fishing industry, it is now home to a thriving multicultural community. Start relaxing once you start strolling along Sok Kwu Wan and Yung Shue Wan's waterfront village streets with shops selling beautiful fisherfolk arts and crafts, and restaurants serving fresh seafood and numerous East-meets-West delights. Nature lovers and Instagram buffs can explore the area's breathtaking scenery and cultural sites along the leisurely 5 km Lamma Island Family Walk, while history buffs can learn more about local culture at Lamma Fisherfolk's Village.

ASMR in Lamma Island

Refuel

There are many local stores and supermarkets selling food, snacks and drinks, so you can refuel near Sok Kwu Wan Pier. You should bring enough water with you if you decide to take the walk to Yung Shue Wan.

  • Sok Kwu Wan

    There is no mistaking Sok Kwu Wan's close links with the fishing industry when you pass a series of fresh fish rafts floating in the bay as your ferry arrives at the pier. Although this tiny village may be much quieter, and not as popular as Yung Shue Wan, on the other side of the island, it attracts many devoted visitors — particularly for its restaurants’ reputations for serving delicious fresh Cantonese seafood cuisine. You can also find many stores selling assorted, locally produced dried seafood. A walk along the seafront, past rows of shops and restaurants, will bring you to a river estuary, where — amid the shallow waters flowing into the sea — if you are lucky, you may spot a school of larval fish and groups of small crabs.

    Get me there
  • Lamma Fisherfolk’s Village

    A visit to this themed cultural village will help you better understand the history of fishing in Hong Kong. You will also be given a glimpse of the traditional daily life and culture of fisherfolk, including traditional dragon boats, rafts and dwellings. You can even board an authentic junk boat for a memorable, close-up experience. The village also features an exhibition with themed folklore booths, and family-friendly games and activities for visitors, including fishing, rope weaving and salted fish-making workshops. There is also a shop selling assorted dried seafood and souvenirs made by local fisherfolk. Entry tickets can be purchased at the kiosk located at Sok Kwu Wan Pier.

    Get me there
  • Tin Hau Temple

    Lamma Island, which was founded on fishing, is home to three different Tin Hau temples, including one in Sok Kwu Wan, which looks more like a modern village house than a traditional temple honouring the Chinese goddess of the sea. The temple was rebuilt in 2005 to replace the original, believed to have been nearly 200 years old, which was destroyed by a fire in January 2004. It contains relics that survived the blaze, including an incense burner from 1826, and iron bell cast in 1895.

    Get me there
  • Hung Shing Yeh Beach

    The small, gently curving stretch of Hung Shing Yeh Beach, with two stubby-finger-like rows of rocks jutting into the sea from the edge of its white sand, is Lamma Island's most popular place for swimming. The annual ranking of the beach has been maintained as ‘Good’ since the Environmental Protection Department's Beach Water Quality Monitoring Programme began in 1986.  Its position at the foot of tree-covered hills provides a cosy setting for a relaxing day of sun, sand and sea. The beach lies close to a number of restaurants and stores where you can enjoy a meal or snacks such as smoky barbecued corn, barbecued sausages and frozen pineapple. Its barbecue area is a great place where families and friends can enjoy a relaxing freshly cooked meal while watching the sunset.

    Get me there
  • Lamma Winds

    The peak of Tai Ling, on Lamma Island, is home to Lamma Winds, or Lamma Wind Power Station, Hong Kong's first wind turbine built to support the city's development of renewable energy. Located some way from Lamma Island Family Walk, it's worth a detour to see this landmark. Hong Kong Electric's grid-connected turbine's three blades, which have a diameter of 50 metres, rotate from a 46-metre-high hub, and each year generate an average of one million units of green energy — offsetting about 800 tonnes of carbon dioxide. The power station features an exhibition area explaining the different forms of renewable energy, and a real-time energy monitor so people can see the outside wind speed and power generated by the turbine.

    The exhibition area of Lamma Winds is now temporarily closed to visitors. Please visit its official website for details.

    Get me there
  • Yung Shue Wan

    The charming fishing village of Yung Shue Wan is the main centre of Lamma Island's thriving multicultural community, which includes a sizeable expatriate population. Its engaging East-meets-West vibe is apparent as soon as you begin to explore the narrow main shopping street hugging the edge of the C-shaped waterfront area, which is lined with stores selling food and groceries, clothes, fisherfolk arts and crafts, gifts and other souvenirs. You will also find a great selection of restaurants serving food to suit all tastes, especially freshly caught seafood, including prawns, clams and fish, popular Western fare such as pizza and pasta, Turkish kebabs, Thai curries and Japanese sushi, plus a number of cafes and bars.

    Get me there

Transport

Getting to Sok Kwu Wan:

Take a ferry to Sok Kwu Wan from Central Pier No. 4 on Hong Kong Island, which is just a short walk from MTR Hong Kong Station. The ferry journey takes 30–40 minutes. There is also a ferry service from Aberdeen to Sok Kwu Wan, which takes about 35 minutes.

Leaving from Yung Shue Wan:

After your visit, you can take a ferry from Yung Shue Wan Pier back to Central, or a ferry back to Aberdeen.

More Routes

Relaxation

Lamma Island: savour laid-back vibe of historic fishing villages now home to multicultural community

Written by South China Morning Post ( Morning Studio )

Lamma Island's laid-back charms — just a short ferry ride from Hong Kong Island — will help you escape the city's hectic lifestyle. Long associated with the fishing industry, it is now home to a thriving multicultural community. Start relaxing once you start strolling along Sok Kwu Wan and Yung Shue Wan's waterfront village streets with shops selling beautiful fisherfolk arts and crafts, and restaurants serving fresh seafood and numerous East-meets-West delights. Nature lovers and Instagram buffs can explore the area's breathtaking scenery and cultural sites along the leisurely 5 km Lamma Island Family Walk, while history buffs can learn more about local culture at Lamma Fisherfolk's Village.

ASMR in Lamma Island

Refuel

There are many local stores and supermarkets selling food, snacks and drinks, so you can refuel near Sok Kwu Wan Pier. You should bring enough water with you if you decide to take the walk to Yung Shue Wan.

Sok Kwu Wan

There is no mistaking Sok Kwu Wan's close links with the fishing industry when you pass a series of fresh fish rafts floating in the bay as your ferry arrives at the pier. Although this tiny village may be much quieter, and not as popular as Yung Shue Wan, on the other side of the island, it attracts many devoted visitors — particularly for its restaurants’ reputations for serving delicious fresh Cantonese seafood cuisine. You can also find many stores selling assorted, locally produced dried seafood. A walk along the seafront, past rows of shops and restaurants, will bring you to a river estuary, where — amid the shallow waters flowing into the sea — if you are lucky, you may spot a school of larval fish and groups of small crabs.

See more...
Get me there
Lamma Fisherfolk’s Village

A visit to this themed cultural village will help you better understand the history of fishing in Hong Kong. You will also be given a glimpse of the traditional daily life and culture of fisherfolk, including traditional dragon boats, rafts and dwellings. You can even board an authentic junk boat for a memorable, close-up experience. The village also features an exhibition with themed folklore booths, and family-friendly games and activities for visitors, including fishing, rope weaving and salted fish-making workshops. There is also a shop selling assorted dried seafood and souvenirs made by local fisherfolk. Entry tickets can be purchased at the kiosk located at Sok Kwu Wan Pier.

See more...
Get me there
Tin Hau Temple

Lamma Island, which was founded on fishing, is home to three different Tin Hau temples, including one in Sok Kwu Wan, which looks more like a modern village house than a traditional temple honouring the Chinese goddess of the sea. The temple was rebuilt in 2005 to replace the original, believed to have been nearly 200 years old, which was destroyed by a fire in January 2004. It contains relics that survived the blaze, including an incense burner from 1826, and iron bell cast in 1895.

See more...
Get me there
Hung Shing Yeh Beach

The small, gently curving stretch of Hung Shing Yeh Beach, with two stubby-finger-like rows of rocks jutting into the sea from the edge of its white sand, is Lamma Island's most popular place for swimming. The annual ranking of the beach has been maintained as ‘Good’ since the Environmental Protection Department's Beach Water Quality Monitoring Programme began in 1986.  Its position at the foot of tree-covered hills provides a cosy setting for a relaxing day of sun, sand and sea. The beach lies close to a number of restaurants and stores where you can enjoy a meal or snacks such as smoky barbecued corn, barbecued sausages and frozen pineapple. Its barbecue area is a great place where families and friends can enjoy a relaxing freshly cooked meal while watching the sunset.

See more...
Get me there
Lamma Winds

The peak of Tai Ling, on Lamma Island, is home to Lamma Winds, or Lamma Wind Power Station, Hong Kong's first wind turbine built to support the city's development of renewable energy. Located some way from Lamma Island Family Walk, it's worth a detour to see this landmark. Hong Kong Electric's grid-connected turbine's three blades, which have a diameter of 50 metres, rotate from a 46-metre-high hub, and each year generate an average of one million units of green energy — offsetting about 800 tonnes of carbon dioxide. The power station features an exhibition area explaining the different forms of renewable energy, and a real-time energy monitor so people can see the outside wind speed and power generated by the turbine.

See more...

The exhibition area of Lamma Winds is now temporarily closed to visitors. Please visit its official website for details.

Get me there
Yung Shue Wan

The charming fishing village of Yung Shue Wan is the main centre of Lamma Island's thriving multicultural community, which includes a sizeable expatriate population. Its engaging East-meets-West vibe is apparent as soon as you begin to explore the narrow main shopping street hugging the edge of the C-shaped waterfront area, which is lined with stores selling food and groceries, clothes, fisherfolk arts and crafts, gifts and other souvenirs. You will also find a great selection of restaurants serving food to suit all tastes, especially freshly caught seafood, including prawns, clams and fish, popular Western fare such as pizza and pasta, Turkish kebabs, Thai curries and Japanese sushi, plus a number of cafes and bars.

See more...
Get me there

Transport

Getting to Sok Kwu Wan:

Take a ferry to Sok Kwu Wan from Central Pier No. 4 on Hong Kong Island, which is just a short walk from MTR Hong Kong Station. The ferry journey takes 30–40 minutes. There is also a ferry service from Aberdeen to Sok Kwu Wan, which takes about 35 minutes.

Leaving from Yung Shue Wan:

After your visit, you can take a ferry from Yung Shue Wan Pier back to Central, or a ferry back to Aberdeen.

More Routes

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