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Antiquity

Peng Chau: uncover the vibrant arts scene on an old industrial island

Written by South China Morning Post

The island of Peng Chau, or ‘flat island’ — covering less than 1 sq km — offers a relaxing retreat with easy trails and a taste of real village life without the bustle of holidaymakers, yet it’s less than an hour’s ferry ride from the central business district on Hong Kong Island.

According to historical records, business activities on Peng Chau were thriving halfway through the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), and in some areas, time seems to have stood still for decades. Despite its small size, the charming island is dotted with Instagram and photography spots — from remains of an old factory, beaches and temples, to street arts which add vibrancy to this tranquil community.

ASMR in Peng Chau

  • Ngan Chau Tsai Pavilion

    Located at the far end of Peng Chau, Ngan Chau Tsai Pavilion is known locally as the ‘edge of the sky and corner of the sea’. To reach it, you have to take a leisurely climb over Finger Hill — rising 96 metres above sea level — before following a narrow trail. Standing on the island's easternmost point, the pavilion offers a panoramic view spanning from Lamma Island, the western part of Hong Kong Island, to Tsing Ma Bridge and Hong Kong Disneyland.

    Get me there
  • Lung Mo Temple

    Lung Mo is a Chinese goddess of water traditionally worshipped by local villagers who often spend time at sea. This temple, which opened next to Tung Wan Beach in 1971, is the largest on the island, and has an interior decorated in gold. Legend has it that aspiring parents who touch the goddess’ bed will be blessed with a good marriage and a greater chance of having children.

    Get me there
  • Tin Hau Temple

    Built in 1792, Peng Chau’s Tin Hau Temple has had a long history. The temple, which celebrates the Goddess of the Sea, is recognised as a Grade II historic building in Hong Kong. A bronze bell inside the temple dates from the 1700s. A stone tablet, erected by local fishermen in the late Qing dynasty can also be seen outside.

    Get me there
  • Leather Factory

    Hidden on the main street of Peng Chau, the Fook Yuen Leather Factory is easily one of the island’s most popular tourist destinations. The former factory — a Grade III historic building constructed in the early 1930s — has been revitalised and transformed into a colourful ‘secret garden’, with artistic graffiti and creative installations made from chairs, bottles and tyres, giving visitors the perfect background for taking selfies. You may also want to check out the newly developed art spaces on the island, or visit the pottery workshops to get a glimpse of the island’s once popular pottery-making industry.

    Get me there
  • Wing On Street & Wing Hing Street

    Any visit to this island is not complete without trying some freshly cooked seafood. A number of cha chaan tengs (traditional Hong Kong cafes) and small restaurants are available along Wing On Street, just a short walk from the ferry pier. Be sure to try some of the local specialties, such as deep-fried shrimp toast, ice cream pineapple bun and steamed shrimp with glutinous rice, before you catch a ferry back to the city. For more food and drink options, there is a supermarket on Po Peng Street; many local grocers on Wing On and Wing Hing streets also sell fruit, snacks and bottles of water and other drinks.

    Get me there
  • Tai Lei Island

    Before heading back to the city, don't miss the island’s perfect spot for enjoying the sunset and taking Instagram-worthy photos — Tai Lei Island, an islet connected to the main island by a short bridge. It has a small beach and is also a popular fishing spot.

    Get me there

Transport

Getting to Peng Chau

Take a ferry from Central Pier No. 6, which is accessible from MTR Hong Kong Station. The trip takes about 25–40 minutes.

Leaving from Peng Chau

After your visit, you can take a ferry back to Central. Alternatively, you may continue the journey by boarding a ferry to nearby Mui Wo or Chi Ma Wan on Lantau Island, or Cheung Chau.

More Routes

Antiquity

Peng Chau: uncover the vibrant arts scene on an old industrial island

Written by South China Morning Post

The island of Peng Chau, or ‘flat island’ — covering less than 1 sq km — offers a relaxing retreat with easy trails and a taste of real village life without the bustle of holidaymakers, yet it’s less than an hour’s ferry ride from the central business district on Hong Kong Island.

According to historical records, business activities on Peng Chau were thriving halfway through the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), and in some areas, time seems to have stood still for decades. Despite its small size, the charming island is dotted with Instagram and photography spots — from remains of an old factory, beaches and temples, to street arts which add vibrancy to this tranquil community.

ASMR in Peng Chau

Ngan Chau Tsai Pavilion

Located at the far end of Peng Chau, Ngan Chau Tsai Pavilion is known locally as the ‘edge of the sky and corner of the sea’. To reach it, you have to take a leisurely climb over Finger Hill — rising 96 metres above sea level — before following a narrow trail. Standing on the island's easternmost point, the pavilion offers a panoramic view spanning from Lamma Island, the western part of Hong Kong Island, to Tsing Ma Bridge and Hong Kong Disneyland.

See more...
Get me there
Lung Mo Temple

Lung Mo is a Chinese goddess of water traditionally worshipped by local villagers who often spend time at sea. This temple, which opened next to Tung Wan Beach in 1971, is the largest on the island, and has an interior decorated in gold. Legend has it that aspiring parents who touch the goddess’ bed will be blessed with a good marriage and a greater chance of having children.

See more...
Get me there
Tin Hau Temple

Built in 1792, Peng Chau’s Tin Hau Temple has had a long history. The temple, which celebrates the Goddess of the Sea, is recognised as a Grade II historic building in Hong Kong. A bronze bell inside the temple dates from the 1700s. A stone tablet, erected by local fishermen in the late Qing dynasty can also be seen outside.

See more...
Get me there
Leather Factory

Hidden on the main street of Peng Chau, the Fook Yuen Leather Factory is easily one of the island’s most popular tourist destinations. The former factory — a Grade III historic building constructed in the early 1930s — has been revitalised and transformed into a colourful ‘secret garden’, with artistic graffiti and creative installations made from chairs, bottles and tyres, giving visitors the perfect background for taking selfies. You may also want to check out the newly developed art spaces on the island, or visit the pottery workshops to get a glimpse of the island’s once popular pottery-making industry.

See more...
Get me there
Wing On Street & Wing Hing Street

Any visit to this island is not complete without trying some freshly cooked seafood. A number of cha chaan tengs (traditional Hong Kong cafes) and small restaurants are available along Wing On Street, just a short walk from the ferry pier. Be sure to try some of the local specialties, such as deep-fried shrimp toast, ice cream pineapple bun and steamed shrimp with glutinous rice, before you catch a ferry back to the city. For more food and drink options, there is a supermarket on Po Peng Street; many local grocers on Wing On and Wing Hing streets also sell fruit, snacks and bottles of water and other drinks.

See more...
Get me there
Tai Lei Island

Before heading back to the city, don't miss the island’s perfect spot for enjoying the sunset and taking Instagram-worthy photos — Tai Lei Island, an islet connected to the main island by a short bridge. It has a small beach and is also a popular fishing spot.

See more...
Get me there

Transport

Getting to Peng Chau

Take a ferry from Central Pier No. 6, which is accessible from MTR Hong Kong Station. The trip takes about 25–40 minutes.

Leaving from Peng Chau

After your visit, you can take a ferry back to Central. Alternatively, you may continue the journey by boarding a ferry to nearby Mui Wo or Chi Ma Wan on Lantau Island, or Cheung Chau.

More Routes

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