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Relaxation

Cheung Sha Beach: delightful ‘exotic’ island destination offers rural hillside setting and fine powdery sand

Written by South China Morning Post (Morning Studio)

Announcement
Announcement

Lifeguard services are not currently available at Upper and Lower Cheung Sha beaches in view of the latest COVID-19 situation. Please refer to LCSD's website for details. The public should not swim at the beaches without lifeguard services in order to avoid accidents.

The fine powdery white sand and clear waters of Lantau Island’s stunning 3km stretch of Cheung Sha Beach, comprising Upper Cheung Sha Beach and Lower Cheung Sha Beach, is Hong Kong’s longest — and one of the cleanest beaches. Its remote, exotic setting — flanked by the island’s lush, tree-covered hilltops — is home to fun-filled water sports activities and delightful, laid-back restaurants and bars serving delicious fresh seafood dishes, wines and cocktails. The area offers a stunning backdrop for holiday photos — with visitors able to relax at Lower Cheung Sha Beach over a meal or coffee, enjoy water sports lessons, or unwind while strolling along Upper Cheung Sha Beach — alone with their thoughts.

  • Upper Cheung Sha Beach

    The dense tropical forest covering the slopes of Lantau Peak — at 934 metres, Hong Kong’s second highest mountain — spills over onto Upper Cheung Sha Beach, which offers a quieter, more relaxing and remote environment than the smaller Lower Cheung Sha Beach, with plenty of space to unwind. Its beach complex features public facilities such as a light refreshment kiosk, barbecue pits, changing rooms, shower facilities and toilets.

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  • Lower Cheung Sha Beach

    Lower Cheung Sha Beach is the ideal location for people to try out a range of water sports. You will find a number of companies at Lower Cheung Sha Beach where it is possible to hire instructors and a range of water sports equipment. It also offers a good selection of relaxing restaurants and coffee shops where you can enjoy lunch and drinks with friends and family. Lantau’s famous feral water buffaloes often stroll along the beach to cool down in the creek running into the sea, which will offer you a fun photo opportunity.

    Food and dining options are all very close together at Lower Cheung Sha Beach. There are trendy, health-conscious fruit and veggie enzyme drinks and Macanese specialities, such as grilled bacalhau (cod) on offer. But a couple of doors down you can find fish and chips, Indonesian (braised) beef rendang, slow-cooked octopus, Greek salads, home-made veggie burgers or grilled salmon steaks. And right next door you’ll find a choice of salads, pizzas and sharing platters.

    To refuel, Lower Cheung Sha Beach has two small convenience shops. They both sell snacks, soft drinks and bottled water, but one of them also offers a good selection of imported food and bottled beers.

    Please note that, like other public beaches in Hong Kong, lifeguard services at Upper and Lower Cheung Sha beaches are available only from April to October — usually from 9am to 6pm; and 8am to 7pm on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays in June, July and August. For safety’s sake, do not swim beyond the red boom-line, particularly not to swim beyond or close to the shark prevention net. For more information, please visit the Leisure and Cultural Services Department’s website.

    Get me there
  • Watersports at Lower Cheung Sha Beach

    The area’s knee-to-waist-high waves are suitable for all beginners. Lessons, and rental equipment for more experienced enthusiasts, are available for bodyboarding, stand-up paddleboarding (SUP), kayaking, windsurfing and surfing — when there are big enough waves, which is most likely during summer. Public changing rooms, shower facilities and toilets are available at the beach.

    The clear waters beside Cheung Sha Beach are ideal places for swimming. But bathers should always observe important safety guidelines. You should always stay out of the sea during thunderstorms and other bad weather and should not swim alone or after dark. Never swim or enter the water when a warning flag is raised for hazards such as a red tide or other water pollution, or strong waves. Do not bring any vessel, boat, canoe, surfboard or waterskis into the swimming zone. For more information, please visit ‘Safety Advice at Public Bathing Beaches’ from the Leisure and Cultural Services Department website.

    Get me there

Transport

Getting to Cheung Sha

Cheung Sha Beach is only about 20 minutes by bus from Tung Chung across the mountains of Lantau Island. From the MTR Tung Chung Station Exit B, take buses 11, 11A or 23 at Tung Chung Station Bus Terminus. For Lower Cheung Sha Beach, get off at the Cheung Sha Ha Tsuen bus stop, walk 60 metres in the same direction as the bus and take the first road left down to the beach. For Upper Cheung Sha Beach, stay on the bus for a further 2km and get off at Upper Cheung Sha Beach bus stop.

Leaving from Cheung Sha

Walk back to Cheung Sha Ha Tsuen bus stop, or Upper Cheung Sha Beach bus stop, to take the same buses back to the terminus near MTR Tung Chung Station.

More Routes

Relaxation

Cheung Sha Beach: delightful ‘exotic’ island destination offers rural hillside setting and fine powdery sand

Written by South China Morning Post (Morning Studio)

Announcement
Announcement

Lifeguard services are not currently available at Upper and Lower Cheung Sha beaches in view of the latest COVID-19 situation. Please refer to LCSD's website for details. The public should not swim at the beaches without lifeguard services in order to avoid accidents.

The fine powdery white sand and clear waters of Lantau Island’s stunning 3km stretch of Cheung Sha Beach, comprising Upper Cheung Sha Beach and Lower Cheung Sha Beach, is Hong Kong’s longest — and one of the cleanest beaches. Its remote, exotic setting — flanked by the island’s lush, tree-covered hilltops — is home to fun-filled water sports activities and delightful, laid-back restaurants and bars serving delicious fresh seafood dishes, wines and cocktails. The area offers a stunning backdrop for holiday photos — with visitors able to relax at Lower Cheung Sha Beach over a meal or coffee, enjoy water sports lessons, or unwind while strolling along Upper Cheung Sha Beach — alone with their thoughts.

Upper Cheung Sha Beach

The dense tropical forest covering the slopes of Lantau Peak — at 934 metres, Hong Kong’s second highest mountain — spills over onto Upper Cheung Sha Beach, which offers a quieter, more relaxing and remote environment than the smaller Lower Cheung Sha Beach, with plenty of space to unwind. Its beach complex features public facilities such as a light refreshment kiosk, barbecue pits, changing rooms, shower facilities and toilets.

See more...
Get me there
Lower Cheung Sha Beach

Lower Cheung Sha Beach is the ideal location for people to try out a range of water sports. You will find a number of companies at Lower Cheung Sha Beach where it is possible to hire instructors and a range of water sports equipment. It also offers a good selection of relaxing restaurants and coffee shops where you can enjoy lunch and drinks with friends and family. Lantau’s famous feral water buffaloes often stroll along the beach to cool down in the creek running into the sea, which will offer you a fun photo opportunity.

Food and dining options are all very close together at Lower Cheung Sha Beach. There are trendy, health-conscious fruit and veggie enzyme drinks and Macanese specialities, such as grilled bacalhau (cod) on offer. But a couple of doors down you can find fish and chips, Indonesian (braised) beef rendang, slow-cooked octopus, Greek salads, home-made veggie burgers or grilled salmon steaks. And right next door you’ll find a choice of salads, pizzas and sharing platters.

To refuel, Lower Cheung Sha Beach has two small convenience shops. They both sell snacks, soft drinks and bottled water, but one of them also offers a good selection of imported food and bottled beers.

See more...

Please note that, like other public beaches in Hong Kong, lifeguard services at Upper and Lower Cheung Sha beaches are available only from April to October — usually from 9am to 6pm; and 8am to 7pm on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays in June, July and August. For safety’s sake, do not swim beyond the red boom-line, particularly not to swim beyond or close to the shark prevention net. For more information, please visit the Leisure and Cultural Services Department’s website.

Get me there
Watersports at Lower Cheung Sha Beach

The area’s knee-to-waist-high waves are suitable for all beginners. Lessons, and rental equipment for more experienced enthusiasts, are available for bodyboarding, stand-up paddleboarding (SUP), kayaking, windsurfing and surfing — when there are big enough waves, which is most likely during summer. Public changing rooms, shower facilities and toilets are available at the beach.

See more...

The clear waters beside Cheung Sha Beach are ideal places for swimming. But bathers should always observe important safety guidelines. You should always stay out of the sea during thunderstorms and other bad weather and should not swim alone or after dark. Never swim or enter the water when a warning flag is raised for hazards such as a red tide or other water pollution, or strong waves. Do not bring any vessel, boat, canoe, surfboard or waterskis into the swimming zone. For more information, please visit ‘Safety Advice at Public Bathing Beaches’ from the Leisure and Cultural Services Department website.

Get me there

Transport

Getting to Cheung Sha

Cheung Sha Beach is only about 20 minutes by bus from Tung Chung across the mountains of Lantau Island. From the MTR Tung Chung Station Exit B, take buses 11, 11A or 23 at Tung Chung Station Bus Terminus. For Lower Cheung Sha Beach, get off at the Cheung Sha Ha Tsuen bus stop, walk 60 metres in the same direction as the bus and take the first road left down to the beach. For Upper Cheung Sha Beach, stay on the bus for a further 2km and get off at Upper Cheung Sha Beach bus stop.

Leaving from Cheung Sha

Walk back to Cheung Sha Ha Tsuen bus stop, or Upper Cheung Sha Beach bus stop, to take the same buses back to the terminus near MTR Tung Chung Station.

More Routes

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