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Islands District: insiders' favourites

LUXE City Guides
  • Written by LUXE City Guides, Images by Calvin Sit
Islands District: insider's favourites

To tour Hong Kong’s various outlying islands is to discover all the charms that the ocean and the great outdoors has to offer. Here you can experience everything from digging your own clams to a gourmet seafood dinner, and everything in between.

Here are some of our top picks.


Herboland

Herboland

Much more than a teahouse, Herboland Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info is Lamma Island's first organic herb farm tucked among the trees behind Hung Shing Yeh Beach. Stroll among the fragrant rosemary and verbena plants, sip a cup of herbal tea — there are 40 varieties available in the tea garden — and soak up some nature while enjoying the company of the farm's rabbits and parrots, or purchase some fresh herbs or handmade soaps to take home. The farm also runs events such as soap-making classes and tours.

Shui Hau Wan

Shui Hau Wan

Hong Kong is well-known for its delicious fresh seafood dishes, but did you know you can catch your own dinner, too? At Shui Hau Wan Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info in the south of Lantau Island, low tide reveals about a kilometre of exposed seabed rife with shellfish ready for the picking. Rent clam-rakes and buckets from one of the nearby family-run shops, and you're set to harvest as many of the delicacies as you can find, with the mountains and sea as your backdrop. Head to Fung Wong Bungalow Centre to get your spoils cooked up into a meal.

Ming Kee Seafood Restaurant

Ming Kee Seafood Restaurant

Po Toi is one of the more difficult islands to get to in Islands District, but it’s worth the effort for the joy of dining at 30-year-old Ming Kee Seafood Restaurant . Occasional ferries depart from Aberdeen and Stanley on Hong Kong Island’s south side, or arrive by private or chartered junk. Once there, feast on seaweed soup with egg and dried shrimp, deep-fried freshly caught squid with salt, pepper and garlic, and other Chinese dishes at affordable prices while relaxing on the restaurant's rustic wooden deck. Wash it all down with a bottle of beer or two. Remember to book your seats in advance.

Tai O Heritage Hotel

Tai O Heritage Hotel

Tai O Heritage Hotel Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info is a former police station built in 1902 to combat pirates, this colonial jewel has been converted into a nine-room boutique hotel by the Hong Kong Heritage Conservation Foundation. Details such as the cannons and searchlights have been painstakingly preserved as reminders of the building’s heritage. Located on a headland, it provides stunning views of the Tai O Fishing Village, especially from Tai O Lookout, the glass-roofed cafe at the top of the property. The property grounds are open to the public, so ask for a map at reception, or join one of the free guided tours of the hotel.

Bather’s

Bather’s

With its easy-breezy open deck and virtual toes-in-the-sand dining, Cheung Sha’s Bather’s restaurant Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info has a relaxed, day-to-night, beachy vibe more commonly found in Phuket than Hong Kong. The modern European menu features homemade burgers, beer-battered barramundi and zesty salads, but you’re here for the flip-fresh seafood and plates to share — washed down with a craft beer or cocktail, naturally. It gets packed on sunny days and holidays so be sure to book ahead, or go for breakfast at the weekend.

Cheung Chau Fish Balls

Cheung Chau Fish Balls

Don't let  Cheung Chau Fish Balls ' simple appearance fool you — the humble fish ball, often doused in curry sauce, is a beloved Hong Kong and southern Chinese street snack, with many locals having their own favourite stall that they swear by. Cheung Chau, however, has a special place among fish ball aficionados, especially this counter next to the ferry pier, which offers up a variety of other meat and seafood balls (and even triangles) along with the classic curry fish ball. There’s no English signage, so look for the queue.

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Information in this article is subject to change without advance notice. Please contact the relevant product or service providers for enquiries.

The Hong Kong Tourism Board disclaims any liability as to the quality or fitness for purpose of third party products and services; and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, adequacy or reliability of any information contained herein.


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