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Journey to West Kowloon: a community art exhibition to the West Kowloon neighbourhood

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Teaming up with the Department of Cultural and Creative Arts of The Education University of Hong Kong (EdUHK), the HKTB supports the community art exhibition Journey to West Kowloon, which showcases over 250 West Kowloon-themed art pieces created by over 650 students from EdUHK, primary and secondary schools. Embark on a profound journey through West Kowloon from a cultural and artistic perspective with the following art pieces!

Aging

Student artist: Emily Tsang

Aging

This work was inspired by the student artist's childhood memories of growing up on Shanghai Street, when she used to dry quilts on the rooftop of a tenement building with her great-grandmother and play hide-and-seek with her cousin among the bamboo laundry poles.

The protective plastic film on the surface of the poles peels off after heavy use. The artist transformed the aging process into her streetscape memories, recalling the pure and priceless moments of life in the past.

Aging expresses the artist's sentimental view about the changes in the vintage district of Yau Ma Tei, and encourages people to slow down and visit the time-tested shops in Yau Ma Tei and savour the warmth of humanity in the neighbourhood.

Candid

Student artists: Kimberly Chan, Jin Ding-ding, Blue Lam, Evelyn Ng, Mary Situ, Ling Tam, Wong Kam-chun, Suki Ma, Major Sze, Kiu Wong, Wing Zeng, Alex Yuen

Candid

Photography is about recording special moments and turning them into an eternity. Behind every photo is a moving story.

The student artists visited Yau Ma Tei, Jordan and West Kowloon to capture heartfelt moments with their cameras, focusing on the authentic, everyday life of their neighbours.

On 12 wooden screens, Candid tells the stories of the everyday life of the neighbourhood in pictures instead of words. 

Congeal

Student artists: Yan Lo, Cindy Chan, Alex Yuen, Wong Sze-hei

Congeal

Hong Kong is a diverse society, and each of its 18 districts are unique. The artists condensed the 18 districts into 18 plasterboards and presented them as a map.

Each plasterboard is textured and coloured with the distinctive characteristics of each district, illustrating Hong Kong's prosperity and appeal as a society where old and new coexist and where East meets West.

Congeal prompts viewers to reflect on their understanding of each district and how they perceive the city, stimulating them to explore all corners of Hong Kong.

Corner

Artists: Annie Sun, Mandy Tam, Yip Yan-tung

Corner

For many shop owners and staff, animals are companions in their everyday life, who grow together with them.

This work brings to life the cats, dogs and sparrows that dwell in the Yau Ma Tei and Jordan neighbourhoods in a lovely animated style.

While we hustle through our daily lives, the animals in the neighbourhood live at a very different pace. Corner reminds viewers to slow down and enjoy this little-known side of the community, and to rethink the relationship between humans and animals.

Filmo-Metro

Student artists: Hailey Chan, Nora Wong, Thea Pang

Filmo-Metro

The three student artists share a passion for film, and Yau Ma Tei, Jordan and West Kowloon are popular locations for Hong Kong films. From the shops and the local community, they heard anecdotes about, and changes in, memorable film scenes from the past.

Filmo-Metro selected seven well-known Hong Kong films and overlaid stills of classic scenes on the action filming locations to reveal the contrast between past and present. 

The motion pictures captured the uniqueness and humanity of this long-standing urban neighbourhood. The student artists believe that Hong Kong films are an integral part of many people's youth. Viewers can retrace the footsteps of the films, revisiting the classic film scenes and rediscovering unparalleled value. Filmo-Metro recalls collective memories and reopens the door to the golden age of Hong Kong cinema to the young.

Glamour

Student artists: Samson Hui, Lam Tze-yu, Brian Li, Lucy Ng, Alice Poon

Glamour

The ubiquitous neon signs are special to Hong Kong and make up an important part of the street scenes in Yau Ma Tei and Jordan.

The colourful works are composed of various shapes and themes, providing a nostalgic perspective of Hong Kong. The works were inspired by four legendary older streets: Temple Street, Public Square Street, Battery Street and Kwun Chung Street.

Neon signs are an integral part of Hong Kong’s night view, as well as a symbol of Hong Kong’s prosperity and vitality. Glamour introduces Hong Kong via the traditional craftsmanship of neon signs, passing down this extraordinary tradition.

Hidden Map

Student artist: Luci Siu

Hidden Map

The student artist was struck by the intertwining of buildings in the area when wandering through Yau Ma Tei, as if they were treasures hidden on a map.

The concept of the mural is a route map introducing the architectural aesthetics of the neighbourhood. The two contrasting colours, orange and blue, represent the architecture and traditional places of interest in the vicinity. They not only demonstrate the contrast between old and new, but also highlight many hidden gems alongside the popular spots.

Hidden Map inspires viewers to explore the neighbourhood in person and reconnect with it in their own way. 

Journey to Yau Ma Tei

Student artist: Lamcat

Journey to Yau Ma Tei

Painting in traditional Chinese ink-and-wash style from a bird's-eye view, the artist meticulously outlined the urban landscape of Yau Ma Tei, Jordan and West Kowloon.

The artwork focuses on a variety of historical buildings and traditional shops that showcase the inner beauty of the long-established communities. Viewers can enjoy finding many interesting details, such as cute cats and Guan Yu killing a cockroach.

Viewers may find a dragon and a tiger, traditional Chinese good-fortune animals, among the neighbourhood buildings. The beasts represent the Chinese idiom ‘crouching tiger, hidden dragon’, which means ‘hidden gems’, describing the marvel of the shops in the area and making a blessing of prosperity for the community. 

Our Neighbour

Student artist: Kallis Ling

Our Neighbour

Historical buildings are art pieces crafted by time. Each and every one of them is unique. With its rich history, West Kowloon displays the traces of time.

Based on the combination of architecture and time, Our Neighbour uses traditional wood panel carving and printing techniques.

Upon close inspection, viewers can see that the work is arranged horizontally in an hourly sequence, and the scenes change vertically through the years.

Our Neighbour urges viewers to appreciate the historical architecture from the perspective of a neighbour of the community to deepen their appreciation of these antique buildings.

Spotlight

Student artists: Yoyo Chan, Winnie Lok

Spotlight

Yau Ma Tei, Jordan and West Kowloon each come with their own history. The student artists have injected new elements into the old vinyl record sleeves, symbolising the addition of new shops to historical antique neighbourhoods.

Shops and buildings in the neighbourhoods are outlined in orange lines and decorated in blue to bring out the underlying message, allowing viewers to uncover the unequalled community spirit in the neighbourhood.

Spotlight focuses on modest but fascinating spots in the community to redirect viewers’ attention to the unsung story of these hidden gems in West Kowloon, and reimagine the other side of the urban dwellings through the artists’ reinterpretations.

Śūnyatā

Student artist: Jase Au

Śūnyatā

Ritualistic worship is an important Hong Kong cultural tradition. The Yau Ma Tei Tin Hau Temple on Temple Street guards the community quietly and is a place where the community gathers in harmony.

Drawing inspiration from the Yau Ma Tei Tin Hau Temple and various local customs, Śūnyatā blends the Taoist goddess Tin Hau with the Buddhist concept of ‘Śūnyatā’. Through the ever-changing nature of all things, the goddess is presented in different forms of clay statues.

That’s the Way to Plant Red Apples

Student artists: Blue Lam, Mary Situ, Jin Ding-ding, Luci Siu

That’s the Way to Plant Red Apples

Four student artists from EdUHK chose red apples as an out-of-the-box metaphor for everyday life, culture and urban myths. They believe that the residents of Yau Ma Tei have planted the seeds of ‘red apples’ in the community through their everyday stories, which allow a unique cultural identity to emerge. People who visit West Kowloon briefly may not get to know the neighbourhood well enough to understand it, and these visits give birth to all kinds of urban myths.

The student artists visited old shops and street stalls in Yau Ma Tei and listened to the stories of the residents. They exchanged chairs and objects that are decorated with traces of their lives, and turned them into art that embodies the hardships and joys of life in the past in the Yau Ma Tei community.

That’s the Way to Plant Red Apples invites viewers to learn more about the charismatic neighbourhood of Yau Ma Tei, encouraging them to go below the surface and seek the core of the red apple. 

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