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Best street markets for bargain souvenirs in Hong Kong

Li Yuen Street East adn West

Hong Kong is a treasure trove of amazing bargains and the best places to find them are at the city’s many open-air street markets. Aside from offering a wide array of wares — many of which make fantastic souvenirs — these marketplaces are also great for practicing your haggling, which adds even more fun to your retail experience. If you want to test your deal-striking skills, head to one of these street markets and get ready to shop until you drop.

Temple Street Night Market

Temple Street Night Market

One of the best places to experience the most colourful side of local culture come evening time, Temple Street Night Market Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info is a bustling, cacophonous bazaar dotted with restaurants, performers and street vendors. You’ll find everything from tea wares and traditional crafts to novelty t-shirts and the latest tech accessories, but be sure to visit several different stalls so you can compare prices and haggle for the best deal. When you’re done with souvenir shopping, head to the north end of the market, where a cluster of fortune-telling booths await to unveil what the future has in store for you.

Ladies’ Market

Ladies’ Market

Comprising more than 100 shops and stalls that stretch across a full kilometre, the Ladies' Market Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info is one of the most iconic street bazaars in town. While the market is most famous for its bargain womenswear (hence its name), you’ll also find accessories, jewellery, toys and quirky souvenirs. Bargaining is the norm here so never accept the seller’s first offer. If you prove yourself to be a steely haggler, you may even find yourself walking away with your objects of desire at 20 or 30 per cent of their original prices.

Stanley Market

Stanley Market

If you’re planning a day trip to the idyllic coastal town of Stanley, be sure to take a stroll through this partially covered market, which is especially popular with tourists. Our advice is to eschew the antiques – you can probably find better deals at Cat Street (Antiques) or other markets – and focus instead on clothes (the stores here often carry larger sizes that are difficult to come by elsewhere in the city), ornaments and pieces of art. To make your visit to Stanley Market Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info even more enriching, check out some of the fascinating historic landmarks nearby, such as Murray House Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info and Tin Hau Temple, or relax at one of the many great restaurants in the area.

Li Yuen Street East and West (fashion)

Li Yuen Street East and West (Fashion)

Central may be known as the heart of high-end shopping in Hong Kong but it’s also where you can score some incredible deals. Just steps away from many luxury brand-name stores, Li Yuen Street East and West (Fashion) Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info are two tiny lanes that are crammed with amazing fashion finds, from traditional Chinese garments and silk to basic everyday wear. The streets are also home to several vintage and wholesale shops, where you might come across branded items at exceptional prices.

Jardine’s Crescent (street market)

Jardine’s Crescent (Street Market)

Located smack in the middle of one of Hong Kong’s busiest districts, Jardine's Crescent (Street Market) Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info is especially popular with locals thanks to its selection of affordable wardrobe essentials. Instead of touristy novelty shirts and questionable antiques, the stalls offer basic tops in various colours, as well as undergarments, loungewear, hair accessories and the like. At the end of the street, you’ll also find a wet market that sells fresh produce and flowers. Despite being smaller than some of the other open-air markets in the city, there’s still plenty to buy and see along this colourful stretch of Causeway Bay.

Chun Yeung Street (wet market)

Chun Yeung Street

While modern supermarket chains may provide convenience, many Hongkongers still prefer to do their grocery shopping at wet markets because of the fresher food and lively communal spirit. If you want to immerse yourself, and your tram, in the truly local experience of wet-market shopping, take a tram to Chun Yeung Market (Wet Market) Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info where you’ll find yourself among everyday citizens perusing through stalls of fresh meats, seafood, fruits and vegetables. It’s also a great place to pick up edible souvenirs, such as bottled sauces or local pastries. While you’re here, hop across to the Marble Road Market, where you’ll find garments, accessories and household items. For your safety, please do not enter the rail area of the tram when you visit the street.

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