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Southern District - insiders' favourites

LUXE City Guides
  • Written by LUXE City Guides, Images by Harold de Puymorin
Southern District - Insiders' Favourites

Hong Kong’s Southern District is laid back, but it’s also one of the city’s most diverse districts. Here, you can experience Hong Kong’s most popular hike, visit artisan shops, and feast at local seafood joints.

Here are some of our top picks.


Dragon’s Back Hike

Dragon's Back Hike

Dragon’s Back offers an accessible 90-minute to two-hour jaunt with sensational panoramas of beaches and mansions, distant mountains and across the South China Sea. It’s also one of the best known, hence busiest , treks, so head out early or go late afternoon to avoid the hordes. To get there, take a bus from Shau Kei Wan or taxi to To Tei Wan on Shek O Road. After a steep 15 to 20-minute climb, you’ll spy signposts to the main trail, which undulates across several hills, ending at the Correctional Institute on Shek O Road. If time permits, carry on to Big Wave Bay for a well-deserved burger and craft beer on the beach.

The Verandah

The Verandah

Take afternoon tea at The Verandah Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info and you’re cast into another era; its whirring ceiling fans, potted palms and Art Deco flourishes hark to a bygone age of leisurely dining. With views over the ocean, this sophisticated restaurant is part of the Repulse Bay Hotel, Hong Kong’s original recreational stay, built on the site of the iconic 20th century hotel bearing the same name. While The Verandah is a reproduction of the original interior, its grand, 1920s decor and elegance offer a nostalgic dip into the past.

Aberdeen Fish Market & Promenade

Aberdeen Fish Market & Promenade

Get a sense of Hong Kong’s seafaring origins at the Aberdeen Fish Market & Promenade . Rock up early and head to the wide, pedestrianised boardwalk, where you’ll encounter fisherfolk selling the day’s catch straight from their brightly coloured boats. Jostle with elderly folk snapping up the best specimens then dive into the market itself, Hong Kong’s only wholesale fish depot. When hunger strikes, Yee Hope Restaurant is the local canteen for flip-fresh seafood and other HK staples. Open from 4am to cater for fisherman and market workers, it's zero frills, there’s no menu and no English spoken, so be prepared to gesticulate — you won’t find fresher fish.

Sin Sin Atelier

Sin Sin Atelier Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info

Owned by cultivated artist, curator and adventurer Sin Sin Man, this diminutive studio shelves a gorgeous, one-of-a-kind stash of artisan-made jewellery, silver, apparel and accessories inspired by her travels across Asia. Having fostered a decades-long relationship with Indonesia, much of the collection is handpicked from the archipelago — don’t miss the beautifully printed fabrics and Southeast Asian artworks.

Limewood, Repulse Bay

Limewood, Repulse Bay

It’s bikinis and boardshorts a go-go at this upscale beach shack overlooking Repulse Bay. Limewood Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info abounds with the buff and the beautiful sipping Aperol spritzes as they graze on wholesome Cali-meets-Asia fare, but you can leave them to stare at their selfies as you tuck in. Seafood is the speciality, from zesty ceviche to line-caught seabass flavoured with chimichurri and tamarind, while the jerked coconut corn and smoky coleslaw are delish. Servings are small, so order plenty to share and book ahead or be prepared to wait, especially on sunny days.

Faux

Faux Get me there {{title}} Address {{address}} Website {{website}} More info

Don’t let the name fool you, everything at this style spot hidden away in an old industrial building is genuinely chic, from the handsome throws and rugs in eco furs to the leather, hide, silk and wool soft furnishings made to order. The exclusive artist editions of fine-bone china and ceramics, from a Happy Valley-inspired porcelain platter to an entire tea set named after Sai Ying Pun, make for souvenirs you’ll actually want to keep.

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The Hong Kong Tourism Board disclaims any liability as to the quality or fitness for purpose of third party products and services; and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, adequacy or reliability of any information contained herein.


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