• Travellers who are affected by the fire at the residential and commercial building, New Lucky House (Address: 15 Jordan Road, Jordan, Kowloon), may contact the Hong Kong Tourism Board at +852 8102 8020 for assistance. 

Speak now

Speak now


I’m Sorry. I didn’t get that.

I’m Sorry. I didn’t get that.

About Ha Pak Nai

Nestled on the coast of the northwestern New Territories in Hong Kong, Pak Nai is a picturesque destination. This wetland area consists of two distinct parts: Sheung Pak Nai (Upper Pak Nai) and Ha Pak Nai (Lower Pak Nai). It’s home to mangroves, oyster beds and rich marine life, including endangered horseshoe crabs, as well as numerous migratory birds. It’s surrounded by mountains and dotted with small villages, offering spectacular views of Deep Bay and, further off, the towering skyscrapers of Shenzhen. As the tide recedes in the evening, nature lovers and photographers flock to the mudflats for the magnificent sunset reflected on the glistening water — arguably one of the most romantic experiences the city’s countryside has to offer.

Recommended Sights around Ha Pak Nai

Ap Tsai Hang, Sheung Pak Nai

Besides the famous sunset from the coastline, Pak Nai has other spots that are worth visiting. Come here a few hours before sunset to explore the tranquil villages. By the Ap Tsai Hang stream, you can unwind over a cup of tea or coffee and Hong Kong-style snacks such as noodles with luncheon meat and fried eggs, fish balls and ice pineapple at the village store.

...See more

Plan your trip with the HKeMobility website for transport options.

Fortified Structure at Ha Pak Nai

A 20-minute walk towards the south along Nim Wan Road — or just a few minutes on the minibus to the Ha Pak Nai terminus — will take you to a historic fortified two-storey building, constructed around 1910 after China’s New Army Uprising in Guangzhou, with links to the late Qing dynasty (1644–1911) revolutionary movement. The rectangular grey brick structure, now a declared monument, formed part of a complex built as a refuge for the failed revolutionaries as they fled over the border. An adjoining house was demolished in the 1930s.

...See more

The Fortified Structure at Ha Pak Nai is open for visits on Monday and Wednesday to Sunday from 9am-1pm and 2pm-5pm. It is closed on Tuesdays (except public holidays), Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day and the first three days of Chinese New Year.

Mudflats at Ha Pak Nai

Watching the magnificent sunset from the mudflats of Ha Pak Nai is a surreal experience. As the tide slowly recedes, oyster beds will emerge in the foreground as the water reflects the brilliant colours of the setting sun and, on certain days, the cloud patterns in the sky. Observe how the sky turns from a mixture of blue and orange to vivid red within a short time — it’s no wonder why so many visitors and photography enthusiasts come here to capture the sunset in all its glory.

The area is also known for its biodiversity. Here, you may spot migratory birds, including the globally endangered black-faced spoonbill, as well as marine creatures such as the endangered Chinese horseshoe crab and rare mangrove horseshoe crab. Horseshoe crabs have existed for 450 million years and pre-dated the dinosaurs. During low tide, you may see these crustaceans emerging from the mudflats.

You’ll likely come across mudskippers scurrying across the wet sand with their fins, too. Like frogs, these amphibious fish can breathe through their skin.

...See more

To find out the best time to admire Ha Pak Nai’s sunsets — clear skies permitting — visit the Hong Kong Observatory website for the weather forecast and sunset time. Respect wildlife. Do not touch, harm or interfere with organisms during observation. Beware of stepping on animals, and keep your movements slow and gentle while walking. Do not take any animals, plants or anything that belong in the mudflats.

Main Street, Lau Fau Shan

Ha Pak Nai’s sunset is certainly a feast for the eyes, but now it’s time for a feast for your stomach! Just a short minibus ride away, the village of Lau Fau Shan is where you can enjoy a scrumptious seafood dinner. The area is a well-established dining destination with a long history of oyster farming. The golden dried oysters here are a sought-after delicacy. One local favourite recipe has the oysters pan-fried until the outside is slightly crusty, while the inside remains tender and bursting with flavour. As well as dried marine produce, the main street is lined with shops offering freshly caught seafood, which customers can choose and have one of the restaurants prepare to order. In the evenings, this enticing village street and its restaurants are often full of happy shoppers and diners, making it a quintessential Hong Kong experience. Aside from golden dried oysters, popular dishes include salt-baked or steamed virgin crabs — also famous here — and Hong Kong classics such as steamed fresh fish with ginger, served with soy sauce and scallions; steamed razor clams with black bean sauce; and baked fresh lobster with cheese sauce, served with e-fu noodles.

...See more
Aerial Shot of Sheung Pak Nai

Ap Tsai Hang, Sheung Pak Nai

Besides the famous sunset from the coastline, Pak Nai has other spots that are worth visiting. Come here a few hours before sunset to explore the tranquil villages. By the Ap Tsai Hang stream, you can unwind over a cup of tea or coffee and Hong Kong-style snacks such as noodles with luncheon meat and fried eggs, fish balls and ice pineapple at the village store.

Next: Fortified Structure at Ha Pak Nai
Aerial View of Fortified Structure

Fortified Structure at Ha Pak Nai

A 20-minute walk towards the south along Nim Wan Road — or just a few minutes on the minibus to the Ha Pak Nai terminus — will take you to a historic fortified two-storey building, constructed around 1910 after China’s New Army Uprising in Guangzhou, with links to the late Qing dynasty (1644–1911) revolutionary movement. The rectangular grey brick structure, now a declared monument, formed part of a complex built as a refuge for the failed revolutionaries as they fled over the border. An adjoining house was demolished in the 1930s.

Next: Mudflats at Ha Pak Nai
Black-faced Spoonbills on Mudflats

Mudflats at Ha Pak Nai

Watching the magnificent sunset from the mudflats of Ha Pak Nai is a surreal experience. As the tide slowly recedes, oyster beds will emerge in the foreground as the water reflects the brilliant colours of the setting sun and, on certain days, the cloud patterns in the sky. Observe how the sky turns from a mixture of blue and orange to vivid red within a short time — it’s no wonder why so many visitors and photography enthusiasts come here to capture the sunset in all its glory.

The area is also known for its biodiversity. Here, you may spot migratory birds, including the globally endangered black-faced spoonbill, as well as marine creatures such as the endangered Chinese horseshoe crab and rare mangrove horseshoe crab. Horseshoe crabs have existed for 450 million years and pre-dated the dinosaurs. During low tide, you may see these crustaceans emerging from the mudflats.

You’ll likely come across mudskippers scurrying across the wet sand with their fins, too. Like frogs, these amphibious fish can breathe through their skin.

Next: Main Street, Lau Fau Shan
A Street Combines Dried Seafood Stalls and Seafood Resturants

Main Street, Lau Fau Shan

Ha Pak Nai’s sunset is certainly a feast for the eyes, but now it’s time for a feast for your stomach! Just a short minibus ride away, the village of Lau Fau Shan is where you can enjoy a scrumptious seafood dinner. The area is a well-established dining destination with a long history of oyster farming. The golden dried oysters here are a sought-after delicacy. One local favourite recipe has the oysters pan-fried until the outside is slightly crusty, while the inside remains tender and bursting with flavour. As well as dried marine produce, the main street is lined with shops offering freshly caught seafood, which customers can choose and have one of the restaurants prepare to order. In the evenings, this enticing village street and its restaurants are often full of happy shoppers and diners, making it a quintessential Hong Kong experience. Aside from golden dried oysters, popular dishes include salt-baked or steamed virgin crabs — also famous here — and Hong Kong classics such as steamed fresh fish with ginger, served with soy sauce and scallions; steamed razor clams with black bean sauce; and baked fresh lobster with cheese sauce, served with e-fu noodles.

Start again

Transport

Getting to Ha Pak Nai or Ap Tsai Hang

Leaving from Lau Fau Shan

Take the MTR Tuen Ma line to MTR Yuen Long Station, then find Exit E leading to Long Yat Road. The minibus 33 station, located on Tai Fung Street, is only about 10 minutes’ walk away. Ha Pak Nai is the terminus of the minibus route, but it is closer to Ap Tsai Hang if you get off one stop before. This service runs daily from 5am to 9:30pm.
From Lau Fau Shan, take bus K65 to MTR Yuen Long Station.

Getting to Ha Pak Nai or Ap Tsai Hang

Take the MTR Tuen Ma line to MTR Yuen Long Station, then find Exit E leading to Long Yat Road. The minibus 33 station, located on Tai Fung Street, is only about 10 minutes’ walk away. Ha Pak Nai is the terminus of the minibus route, but it is closer to Ap Tsai Hang if you get off one stop before. This service runs daily from 5am to 9:30pm.

Leaving from Lau Fau Shan

From Lau Fau Shan, take bus K65 to MTR Yuen Long Station.

Feature stories

Explore Hong Kong with insider tips

Feature stories

Explore Hong Kong with insider tips

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website, to understand your interests and provide personalized content to you as further set out in our Cookie Policy here. If you accept the use of cookies on our website, please indicate your acceptance by clicking the "I accept" button. You may manage your cookies settings at any time.