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Good to know

Good to know

While Hong Kong is an easy city to visit, let us make it even more of a cinch with this useful collection of practical information. It will be a breeze with maps, apps, tips and guides, as well as the latest on immigration, transportation and more.


Climate

7-day weather forecast
             
Today
           
25 September
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25 September
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26 September
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27 September
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28 September
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29 September
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30 September
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27°C
80°F
Drop 78%
25-30°C
77-86°F
Drop 65-95%
25-28°C
77-82°F
Drop 80-95%
25-28°C
77-82°F
Drop 80-95%
25-28°C
77-82°F
Drop 80-95%
26-29°C
78-84°F
Drop 75-95%
27-31°C
80-87°F
Drop 70-95%
             
Climate

Hong Kong has a subtropical climate. The only predictable weather events that could have a significant impact on your travel plans are typhoons.

Typhoon season begins in May and ends in November. When a typhoon is approaching, warnings are broadcast on television and radio. There are various degrees of warning signals issued by the Hong Kong Observatory, but when the No. 8 signal is in place, most businesses and shops close down and flights may be cancelled. There is a separate warning system for heavy rain.

You can find detailed weather updates for tourist attractions on the Hong Kong Weather Information for Tourists website. While you’re in Hong Kong, you can also dial 1878 200 and press '3' for English to check the latest situation.

What to expect from Hong Kong’s seasons and what to pack    

SPRING (MARCH TO MAY)

Temperature and humidity are rising. Evenings can be cool.

What to pack: Bring long-sleeved shirts or a light jacket for the evenings, and an umbrella or light rainwear for the occasional spring drizzle.

 

SUMMER (JUNE TO AUGUST)

Hot, humid and sunny, with occasional showers and thunderstorms. The temperature can exceed 31°C but high humidity levels can make it feel even hotter.

What to pack: Wear light and breathable clothing, but also prepare a jacket as air-conditioning may be strong in indoor areas such as shopping malls and on public transport. Remember to bring an umbrella or light rain gear, as there may be monsoons in the summer. Mosquito repellent and sunglasses are also recommended for extended outdoor activities. Bring swimming gear! Summer is the perfect time to enjoy Hong Kong’s beaches and water sports.

 

AUTUMN (SEPTEMBER TO NOVEMBER)

There are pleasant breezes, plenty of sunshine and comfortable temperatures. Many people regard these as the best months of the year to visit Hong Kong.

What to pack: Dress in breathable clothing, but also prepare warmer clothing such as jackets for the cooler mornings and evenings. Autumn is the hiking season in Hong Kong, so don’t forget to bring a good pair of walking shoes.

 

WINTER (DECEMBER TO FEBRUARY)

Cool, dry and cloudy, with occasional cold fronts. The temperature can drop below 10°C in urban areas.

What to pack: Pack warm garments such as wool sweaters and coats. Bring along a few pieces of thermal wear for extra layers if needed.

 

There’s generally no need to worry about dress codes unless you are planning to visit up-market restaurants and bars in the city, which normally do not admit flip-flops and shorts. We advise you to check ahead for dress codes required by the establishments you are planning to visit.


Electricity & voltage

Electricity & Voltage

The standard electrical voltage in Hong Kong is 220 volts AC, 50Hz. Most hotel bathrooms also have outlets for 100 volts, but if not, you will need a transformer for any appliance or electrical equipment. The majority of electrical outlets in Hong Kong take a three-pronged UK-style plug.


Currency & e-payment

The Hong Kong Dollar

THE HONG KONG DOLLAR

The legal tender in Hong Kong is the Hong Kong dollar (HKD), which is pegged to the US dollar at a rate of about 7.80 HKD to 1 USD, although exchange rates may fluctuate slightly. 

CHANGING MONEY

You can exchange your currency for Hong Kong dollars at any authorised money exchanger. For extra peace of mind, look for a money exchanger that is accredited by the Quality Tourism Services (QTS) Scheme. At Hong Kong International Airport, currency exchange counters are open from early morning until late at night and many located within the city stay open into the evening. ATMs are widespread and operate 24 hours. Exchange rates fluctuate daily depending on currency markets.

Currency converter by yahoo: finance.yahoo.com/currency-converter/ 

 

CREDIT CARDS & ELECTRONIC PAYMENTS

International credit cards such as American Express, VISA, Diners Club and MasterCard are also welcome at many hotels, retail shops and restaurants. Some department stores, chain retail shops and restaurants also accept electronic payments such as Apple Pay, Android Pay, Alipay and WeChat Pay. Such premises usually display stickers showing the credit cards and electronic payments they accept at their entrances or at the cash register.

 

ATM

ATMs can be found almost everywhere. Many take international cards and some HSBC 'Electronic Money' machines provide 24-hour cash withdrawal (HK$) facilities for Visa and MasterCard holders. Some even provide foreign currency withdrawal service.

Learn more at HSBC.    


Language

Language

Chinese and English are the official languages of Hong Kong. All official signs and public transport announcements, as well as most menus, are bilingual.

Cantonese is the mother tongue of the majority of Hong Kong residents, which has distinctively different pronunciation to Mandarin widely spoken in the Mainland.

Hong Kong: Heung Gong

Hello: Nei-hou (sounds like ley-ho)

Thank you — when someone offers you a service (pouring tea): ng-goi (sounds like mmm-goy)

Excuse me / please — asking for something: ng-goi (sounds like mmm-goy)

Thank you — when accepting a gift from some one: doh-je (sounds like door-chair)

Good morning — greeting in the morning: jou-sen (sounds like joe-san)

Goodnight: jou-tau (sounds like joe-towe)

Goodbye: joi-gin (sounds like joy-gee-n)

How much: gei-do-chin (sounds like gay-do-chin)

Yummy: hou-hou-sihk (sounds like ho-ho sick)

Order please: shei-yei, ng-goi (sounds like say-yeah, mmm goy)

Bill please: Maih-dan, ng-goi (sounds like my-dan, mmm goy)

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