Hong Kong Asia's World City

Yau Tsim Mong

Yau Tsim Mong

A shoppers’ paradise

“Stylish people love to come here for special local designs. These made-in-Hong Kong designs are of good quality at a bargain price,” says 26-year-old designer Jimmy Ku.

For such a compact district—it only measures about seven square kilometers—Yau Tsim Mong, which comprises the popular areas of Yau Ma Tei, Tsim Sha Tsui and Mong Kok, is one of the most densely populated in Hong Kong. It’s absolutely chock-a-block with cultural sights, historic buildings, themed streets and, most importantly, shops: this is the area to come if you’re searching for super-trendy shopping malls, wholesale outlets, street markets, bazaars, local fashion designers—and much more besides.

Jimmy Ku

This giant world bazaar offers so much to the visitor that you just can’t find outside of Hong Kong, with plenty of opportunities for young designers. 26-year-old designer Jimmy Ku set up brand RDM (Rue du Musée) with partners in the trendy Granville Circuit in 2012: “As a shopping paradise, years ago people would come to Hong Kong for its tax-free luxury brands, but in recent years people tend to find something unique and special here—something which is made in Hong Kong and can’t be found in other countries,” he explained. People love to shop here for a bargain, he added: “All the little boutiques are packed in a tiny mall and because the competition is very keen, we set the price very low. Therefore people can always find better quality products at a bargain price here—stylish people love to come here for special local designs. These made-in-Hong Kong designs are of good quality at a bargain price.”

Bunkaya Zakkaten

Around every corner you turn, you can definitely get this vibe: that shops are all packed together—usually in themed streets—to offer a real bargain for the consumer as well as something a little out of the ordinary. Step into the Sino Centre for example and you’ll find a whole world of Japanese comic and popular cartoon paraphernalia. Think miniature cartoon figures, trendy gadgets, magazines, DVDs, Japanese comics, K-pop posters and more all under one roof. In keeping with the Japanese theme, just around the corner in Kimberley Street is the Hong Kong branch of kitsch Tokyo concept store Bunkaya Zakkaten, which sells a selection of quirky and bizarre imported handicrafts and accessories. Browse inside the homely store for Japanese curios, fashionable accessories, eclectic homeware items and a small range of vintage clothing. Carry on the cultural, arty journey at nearby Kubrick: sat next door to the Broadway Cinematheque (which shows minor art cinema in Hong Kong), this is one of the city’s best film, book and disc stores. Besides selling artsy concept books and art movie posters, there’s a corner devoted to family records, plus a little café which also hosts exhibitions.

Yau Tsim Mong’s themed streets are famous the world over—you have everything you’d want here all collected into one appropriately named avenue, such as “Bird Garden”, (Hong Lok Street) “Korean Street”, (Kimberley Street) and “Ladies' Market”(Tung Choi Street). If you’re on the hunt for local fashion, head to Fa Yuen Street, often referred to as “Sneakers Street” for the row upon row of footwear stores here. Buried along here is the hidden gem, Mee & Gee (Me & George) Import Shop: a second-hand vintage shop that is a hit with Hongkongers. It’s packed to the rafters with the colorful and the floral; with retro shirts, dresses, skirts and pants at a fixed bargain price. Kwong Wah Street is more commonly known in the neighborhood as “Gun Street” as it sells a range of military equipment and supplies—some real, some for fun. Some shops have been established here for more than two decades, so you’re in safe hands while you’re stocking up on electrical airsoft rifles, combat gear and related accessories.

food

Shopping is hungry work, so be sure to plan a pitstop during your day at one of the many trending Hong Kong eateries Yau Tsim Mong. “Korean Street” is aptly named as it’s home to some of the city’s best “hof” bars: Korean Fried Chicken and beer joints that are taking over the city. Chicken Hof & Soju (or Lee Family Chicken as its sometimes called) could be credited with starting the craze but this bare-bones diner is definitely one of the most popular in town. Each order gets you an entire mountain of fried chicken, from breast to drumstick, in assorted flavors that you should pair with some soju. For more local delights head to Dundas Street, which is renowned for its savory street snacks. You can always see people lining up at Kai Kee Snack—they’re waiting for skewers of stinky tofu (chunks of crispy, fermented beancurd that have been deep-fried before being slathered with your choice of sauce), or the deep-fried squid.

Finally, for a bit of a fun spin on the quintessential Hong Kong dim sum, come armed with your camera to Hello Kitty Chinese Cuisine, a world first that provides healthy, organic dim-sum—styled as the Japanese cult character Hello Kitty. However seriously the professional chefs take their craft, you can’t help but smile at the egg custard buns and mounds of rice shaped into a cat’s face.

For an insider’s glimpse into Hong Kong culture and society, this three-hour evening walk will give visitors a taste of local entertainment, dining and shopping Good Evening Kowloon tour.

 

Do-it-Yourself

Morning
  • Mee & Gee Import Shop
    Dig vintage gems
    Mee & Gee Import Shop
    Mee & Gee (Me & George) Import Shop is a second-hand vintage shop that is a hit with Hongkongers. It’s packed to the rafters with the colorful and the floral; with retro shirts, dresses, skirts and pants at a fixed bargain price. If you want to get a retro 80s Hong Kong party going back home with your friends, here is where you start dressing up—just be prepared to rummage among the racks.
    Address:
    G/F, 181 Fa Yuen Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon
    Tel:
    +852 2394 8057
    How to Get There:
    MTR Mong Kok Station, Exit E2. Walk for 3 minutes along Nelson Street to the corner of Fa Yuen Street.
  • Sino Centre
    Get into comic culture
    Sino Centre
    Step into the Sino Centre in buzzing Mong Kok and you’ll find a whole world of Japanese comic and popular cartoon paraphernalia. The three-floor center is full of myriad tiny shops, all selling items of popular youth culture: think miniature cartoon figures, trendy gadgets, magazines, DVDs, Japanese comics, K-pop posters and more all under one roof.
    Address:
    582-592 Nathan Road, Mong Kok, Kowloon
    How to Get There:
    MTR Mong Kok Station, Exit E2. Walk south along Nathan Road for about 4 minutes.
  • Kai Kee Snack
    Grab a street snack
    Kai Kee Snack
    You can always see people lining up at Kai Kee Snack—they’re waiting for skewers of stinky tofu (chunks of crispy, fermented beancurd that have been deep-fried before being slathered with your choice of sauce), or the deep-fried squid.
    Address:
    41 Dundas Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon
    How to Get There:
    MTR Yau Ma Tei Station, Exit A2. Walk along Nathan Road and turn right to Dundas Street. It’s a 4-minute walk.
  • Kwong Wah Street
    Prepare for war games
    Kwong Wah Street
    Kwong Wah Street is more commonly known in the neighborhood as “Gun Street” as it sells a range of military equipment and supplies—some real, some for fun. Some shops have been established here for more than two decades, so feel free to ask for some war game tips from the experienced shop owners while you’re stocking up on electrical airsoft rifles, combat gear and related accessories.
    Address:
    Kwong Wah Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon
    How to Get There:
    MTR Yau Ma Tei Station, Exit A2. Walk north along Nathan Road and turn right into Dundas Street. Then make a left onto Kwong Wa Street. It’s about a 5-minute walk.
  • Kubrick
    Take a breath of culture
    Kubrick
    Right next to the Broadway Cinematheque, which shows minor art cinema in Hong Kong, Kubrick is one of the city’s best film, book and disc stores. Besides selling artsy concept books and art movie posters, there’s a corner devoted to family records, plus a little café which also hosts exhibitions.
    Address:
    Shop H2, Prosperous Garden, 3 Public Square Street, Yau Ma Tei, Kowloon
    Tel:
    +852 2384 8929
    How to Get There:
    MTR Yau Ma Tei Station, Exit C. Walk left along Man Ming Lane and turn left on Reclamation Street. Kubrick is on the right. It’s about a 5-minute walk.
Afternoon
  • Hello Kitty Chinese Cuisine
    Try trendy dim sum
    Hello Kitty Chinese Cuisine
    For a bit of a fun spin on the quintessential Hong Kong dim sum, come armed with your camera to Hello Kitty Chinese Cuisine, a world first that provides healthy, organic dim-sum—styled as the Japanese cult character Hello Kitty. However seriously the professional chefs take their craft, you can’t help but smile at the egg custard buns and mounds of rice shaped into a cat’s face.
    Address:
    Shop A to C, Lee Loy Mansion, 332-338 Canton Road, Jordan, Kowloon
    Tel:
    +852 8202 8203
    How to Get There:
    MTR Jordon Station, Exit C1. Walk along Bowring Street for about 5 minutes.
  • Bunkaya Zakkaten
    Hunt for Japanese treasures
    Bunkaya Zakkaten
    Hong Kong branch of kitsch Tokyo concept store Bunkaya Zakkaten, which sells a selection of quirky and bizarre imported handicrafts and accessories. Browse inside the homely store for Japanese curios, fashionable accessories, eclectic homeware items and a small range of vintage clothing.
    Address:
    1/F, 22 Kimberley Street, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
    Tel:
    +852 2721 2227
    How to Get There:
    MTR Tsim Sha Tsui Station, Exit B2. Walk along Cameron Road and turn left onto Carnarvon Road. Make a right onto Kimberley Street. It’s about a 5-minute walk.
Evening
  • Chicken Hof & Soju
    Sample the Korean craze
    Chicken Hof & Soju
    Chicken Hof & Soju (or Lee Family Chicken as it’s sometimes called) could be credited with bringing the Korean Fried Chicken craze to Hong Kong, but this bare-bones diner is definitely one of the most popular in town. Each order gets you an entire mountain of fried chicken, from breast to drumstick, in assorted flavors. Whether you order grilled chicken or fried chicken, don’t forget to pair it with soju or a glass of beer.
    Address:
    Kam Kok Mansion, 84 Kimberley Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
    Tel:
    +852 2375 8080
    How to Get There:
    MTR Tsim Sha Tsui Station, Exit B1. Walk north along Nathan Road and turn right into Kimberley Road. It’s about a 10-minute walk.

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This guide was produced by HK Magazine Media Group from 2014-2015.

The Hong Kong Tourism Board disclaims any liability as to the quality or fitness for purpose of third party products and services; and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy, adequacy or reliability of any information contained herein.

Information in this guide is subject to changes without advance notice. Please contact the relevant product or service providers for enquiries.

While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this guide, the Hong Kong Tourism Board and HK Magazine accept no responsibility for any obsolescence, errors or omissions contained herein.

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