Dine & Drink

Late Night Eats

Late Night Eats

In Hong Kong, eating is not always about what you put in your gob, or even where. To experience the vibrant eating culture, you also have to consider when to eat. Hot, humid days are the probable cause of the busy night markets found in southern China; but in Hong Kong this tropical custom is only one factor in the popularity of midnight munchies. Other factors include the 24 hour nature of this fast paced city and the tendency of its industrious population to work late into the evening.

Whatever the reasons, if you get on the Hong Kong clock and schedule your meal a bit later, you’ll be able to experience some of the city’s truest flavours.

What to order?

From the traditional street stalls (called dai pai dong) to the late-night hotel buffets, just about any type of food can be found late at night. Some of the most popular night-time eats include Chiu Chow da lang, Chinese desserts, hotpot, noodles and congee. Look for these, and you’ll probably find a bustling nighthawk venue.

Chiu Chow da lang

Chiu Chow people came to Hong Kong from the region in China’s Guangdong Province now referred to as Chaozhou. Their cuisine is popular in Hong Kong, especially the late night street stall fare, called da lang. Relatively salty, Chiu Chow da lang goes well with a cold beer.

Chiu Chow da lang

Hong Kong Desserts

Before the idea of death-by-chocolate at midnight terrifies you away, note we said Hong Kong desserts. As varied and diverse as the city that created them, Hong Kong sweets are often fusions of Chinese and Southeast Asian flavours and tend to be lighter than their European counterparts. Popular ingredients include sweet bean, glutinous rice, tofu and lots of tropical fruits.

Food columnist and TV and radio host, Michelle Loo, recommends the Super Durian Slush Drinks at Auntie Sweet:

Hong Kong Desserts
Auntie Sweet
Address: G/F, 13 Tsing Fung Street, Tin Hau, Hong Kong Island
Tel: +852 2508 6962
 How to get there: MTR Tin Hau Station, Exit A2

Hotpot

When eating hotpot, diners stew  ingredients including meats, seafood and vegetables in a pot of soup; but Chinese hotpot comes in a dizzying array of shapes and sizes. Nonetheless, it is always a hearty, communal eating experience best enjoyed with friends and beers on a wintery evening.

Hotpot

Noodle and Congee

Noodles and the rice porridge called congee are often served under the same roof and in late night eateries. Congee ranges from the plain starchy variety to the lighter versions that include vegetables and meat and even hotpots in which the ingredients are cooked in a congee soup.

Jacky Yu, chef, restaurateur, author and food critic recommends Congee-based Hotpot at Sun Kau Kee Noodle:

Noodle and Congee
Sun Kau Kee Noodle
Address: 9 Tai Wong Street East, Wan Chai, Hong Kong Island
Tel: +852 2865 2827
 How to get there: MTR Wan Chai Station, Exit A3, turn right onto Johnston Road and walk for about 7 minutes.

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